1. Pretty remarkable lineup at this March 16 SFMOMA Bearing Witness presentation on the current state of photography, and lucky us that they kept the video of the daylong event online. Video 1 features Margaret Olin, Susan Meiselas and Zoe Strauss; 2 includes Pete Brook and Doug Rickard; Kathy Ryan in the third.

    SFMOMA host page

  2. http://imgur.com/a/jqnv2 →

  3. visual-poetry:

    »sol sans« by ian whittlesea

    a typeface based on sol lewitt’s handwritten sentences on conceptual art

  4. yoisthisracist:

annehstevens asked: The UNLV Running Rebels have a Confederate general as a mascot. This is what happens when you don’t get rid of your racist mascots: http://www.reviewjournal.com/sports/uproar-after-unlv-rebellion-accused-posting-racist-photo Yeah, it’s a real surprise that a bunch of assholes hanging on to “The Rebels” as a mascot might turn out to be a bunch of fucking racists.

    yoisthisracist:

    annehstevens asked: The UNLV Running Rebels have a Confederate general as a mascot. This is what happens when you don’t get rid of your racist mascots: http://www.reviewjournal.com/sports/uproar-after-unlv-rebellion-accused-posting-racist-photo

    Yeah, it’s a real surprise that a bunch of assholes hanging on to “The Rebels” as a mascot might turn out to be a bunch of fucking racists.

  5. Ai Weiwei Responds to Vase Dropper

    hyperallergic:

    image

    A GIF version of unverified video footage found by the BBC of Caminero dropping the Ai vase (GIF by Hrag Vartanian for Hyperallergic)

    In his first remarks since local artist Maximo Caminero smashed a vase in one of his artworks on view at the Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM), Ai Weiwei told the Associated Press that he doesn’t understand or agree with the vandal’s actions. ”Damaging other people’s…

    View On WordPress

  6. (via World Press Photo win is ‘bittersweet’, says John Tlumacki of his Boston Marathon bombing image » British Journal of Photography)
This photograph mystifies me. Rather, its selection as a World Press Photo spot single award winner mystifies me. It’s an awkward image, unresolved but not dynamic, without the sense that the image has imposed some kind of fleeting visual order in the chaos. I see coughing, screaming, haze and collapse, people moving around and trying to get their footing. And there is Carlos Arredondo, climbing over the fence — or rather, there is the flag, standing out brighter and clearer than anything in the image. Maybe that’s the appeal. Maybe people who have that instinctive attachment to the signs of patriotism visually locked onto that detail and felt the rest of the image fall into place around it. If the flag is the anchor of the picture, then I see balance in the reds on the right — the jacket, the sleeve, the blood spilled — and this helps impose some order on the rest of the image. OK, I see it.
Well, if I may quote William Klein, fuck that. I’m not interested in the photographic legacy of this event falling over into flag worship. God knows we have seen enough flags-in-the-rubble images to last more lifetimes than we have to spare. The action that is most significantly captured in this image is Arredondo’s rush to action, which in this image looks tentative and inconspicuous. I am not moved by the fact that he hoists the flag while trying to find a foothold in this moment. No.
What we know about Carlos Arredondo — and there is a lot to know — we know from other photographs. Better ones. Ones that have their priorities in place.

    (via World Press Photo win is ‘bittersweet’, says John Tlumacki of his Boston Marathon bombing image » British Journal of Photography)

    This photograph mystifies me. Rather, its selection as a World Press Photo spot single award winner mystifies me. It’s an awkward image, unresolved but not dynamic, without the sense that the image has imposed some kind of fleeting visual order in the chaos. I see coughing, screaming, haze and collapse, people moving around and trying to get their footing. And there is Carlos Arredondo, climbing over the fence — or rather, there is the flag, standing out brighter and clearer than anything in the image. Maybe that’s the appeal. Maybe people who have that instinctive attachment to the signs of patriotism visually locked onto that detail and felt the rest of the image fall into place around it. If the flag is the anchor of the picture, then I see balance in the reds on the right — the jacket, the sleeve, the blood spilled — and this helps impose some order on the rest of the image. OK, I see it.

    Well, if I may quote William Klein, fuck that. I’m not interested in the photographic legacy of this event falling over into flag worship. God knows we have seen enough flags-in-the-rubble images to last more lifetimes than we have to spare. The action that is most significantly captured in this image is Arredondo’s rush to action, which in this image looks tentative and inconspicuous. I am not moved by the fact that he hoists the flag while trying to find a foothold in this moment. No.

    What we know about Carlos Arredondo — and there is a lot to know — we know from other photographs. Better ones. Ones that have their priorities in place.

  7. hello-rossalyn:

    blloooooo:

    omfg i did not fucking expect that

    LOL

    (Source: tastefullyoffensive)

  8. Where would we be without limit cases? Maybe this kind of thing will be to copyright law what the Scientologists are to the separation of church and state. Or maybe the wrong court will have a complete void where their sense of humor should be. Parody is like porn, and while everyone thinks they know it when they see it, there are different strokes for different folks. So far, the Dumb Starbucks people have undermined the genius of their concept and execution with underprepared PR; the whole thing looked tight as hell until somebody got in front of a reporter and said, basically, “we just really like starbucks and we wanted to see if we could get away with this.”
shortformblog:

Dumb question: Is it enough to add the word “dumb” in front of something for it to count as a parody? That’s something “Dumb Starbucks” is claiming.

    Where would we be without limit cases? Maybe this kind of thing will be to copyright law what the Scientologists are to the separation of church and state. Or maybe the wrong court will have a complete void where their sense of humor should be. Parody is like porn, and while everyone thinks they know it when they see it, there are different strokes for different folks. So far, the Dumb Starbucks people have undermined the genius of their concept and execution with underprepared PR; the whole thing looked tight as hell until somebody got in front of a reporter and said, basically, “we just really like starbucks and we wanted to see if we could get away with this.”

    shortformblog:

    Dumb question: Is it enough to add the word “dumb” in front of something for it to count as a parody? That’s something “Dumb Starbucks” is claiming.

  9. Bad books on writing tell you to “WRITE WHAT YOU KNOW”, a solemn and totally false adage that is the reason there exist so many mediocre novels about English professors contemplating adultery.

    — 

    Joe Haldeman (via wordpainting)

    I’m sure you can find the photo equivalent easily.

    (via conscientious)